12 Haunted Forests from Across the World! Visit #8 at Your Own Risk!

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Published on April 20th, 2017 | by Brandon Ramsey in Geography | Travel


The world has plenty of forests, but not all of them boast a dark past and a supernatural reputation. Today, we’re looking at twelve haunted forests that have gained a reputation for being absolutely and positively haunted.

Enter these places (and this article) at your own risk!

1. The Black Forest, Germany

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Germany’s Black Forest is known for being the setting of numerous Grimm fairy tales, and I’m not talking about the ones that end with “happily ever after…” The trees block out most of the light here, leaving nothing infinite darkness to hide the horrors that the Grimm brothers described in their stories.

2. Freetown State Forest, Massachusetts

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This forest is situated within the Bridgewater Triangle, which is known for its string of paranormal phenomenon. The land here was formerly the home of the Wampanoag people, who believed the place was sacred and used it as an Indian burial ground. Yep, always a good idea to trespass on one of those, any horror movie will tell you that.

Worse, is the fact that a cult leader by the name of Carl Drew used to slaughter women as sacrifices in these woods. It gets worse than that, but we’ll leave the rest to your imagination. Trust us, it will be better that way.

3. Dering Woods, England

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The Dering Woods in England are known for being one of the most haunted places in the country. It is said that you can hear the screams of lost souls at night. Charming, right? It gets better (worse?). In 1948, 20 people were found dead in the woods.

4. Old House Woods, Virginia

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This forest was the site of numerous battles in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Located in Diggs, Virginia, this forest is known for numerous ghost sightings. There’s also stories of people who have gone into the woods and never come out.

People who have gone into the forest even say that it’s at least 10 degrees colder in the woods than other areas. Stories about ghost sightings go back more than 200 years here.

5. Pocomoke Forest, Maryland

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Pocomoke forest is both dense and swampy, oh, and it also has a history of slave abuse and deaths. Stories here are gruesome and involve the deaths of illegitimate children slave owners had with their slaves.

In the more fantastical sense, are reports of elemental sightings that appear as mist creatures that emit light.

6. Hoia-Baciu, Romania

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This place is known as the Bermuda Triangle of Transylvania. So, vampire, werewolves, that kind of stuff. This forest is known for its oddly curved trees. No one knows for sure why they ended up growing this way, but it’s really creepy that all of them decided to do it the same way.

People who visit have reported nausea, rashes, vomiting, headaches, and extreme anxiety. In other cases, people have been gone in the woods for hours, only to return with no memory of what happened while they were in there.

7. Ballyboley Forest, Northern Ireland

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This forest is known for its stone arrangements that (probably) don’t mean anything and circular trenches. Turns out, this is also an ancient Druid site that is supposed to hold the location to the Celtic Otherworld. Okay, so now that stones definitely mean something.

While the British government claims that the forest was planted in 1957, my conspiracy alarms are going off right now.

8. Aokigahara Forest, Japan

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This forest is located at the base of Mount Fuji, so it must be a beautiful place to take a stroll…right? Wrong. This is known as the Suicide Forest. Each year, over 100 suicides happen here. It’s gotten so bad that the government had to put up signs urging people to turn back and seek help for their depression.

9. Dow Hill, India

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This forest has the title of being one of the most haunted forests and places in India. Visitors claim they feel like they’re being watched here. They even spot movement in their peripheral vision. Some have described hearing a screaming woman, and other say they see red eyes in the trees.

One of the most famous stories is of a headless boy who has been seen wandering the forest.

10. Devil’s Tramping Ground, North Carolina

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Located in the hills of southern Chatham County is a place in the woods called The Devil’s Tramping Ground. It gets its name because it is composed of a circle 40-feet in diameter where not a single plant will grow. No trees, flowers, grass, or even weeds.

If you try to plant something there, it won’t grow. If you try to transplant a plant to this location, it will die. Dogs hate it here, and objects left inside the circle overnight as violently ejected from its boundaries by the next day.

11. Pine Barrens, New Jersey

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The Pine Barrens cover 1.1 million acres of South Jersey. It’s also home to the Jersey Devil. The legend states that Ms. Leeds gave birth to 12 children, but her thirteenth child was the devil, complete with a goat head and hooves. It also had wings and a forked tail.

People still report sightings of the beast, but it could just as easily be a cast member of a certain MTV reality show. From far away, it’s hard to tell.

12. Epping Forest, England

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This forest was the hideout for an infamous highwayman named Dick Turpin who was known for burying his murder victims in the woods. People who visit the forest report seeing headless men, the sounds of war drums, and apparitions who leap from the trees and dive into the road.

Of further interest, are the hotspots known as Hangman’s Hill and the Suicide Pool. Sounds like a nice place, all-in-all.

Would you visit any of these haunted forests locations? Share this list and let us know in the comments!



About the Author
Brandon Ramsey

Brandon Ramsey is the head author and editor of The Time Now Blog. Be sure to follow us via social media!


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